Case Studies: Toys/Video Games

  • Mattel, Inc: The Lead Paint Recall Photo

    Mattel, Inc: The Lead Paint Recall

    M. Eric Johnson
    Length: 19 pages
    Publication date: 2010
    Case#: 6-0033

    Supply chains face many risks, from material flow disruption and quality failures to information security. In some cases those risk come from suppliers in other cases they come from downstream partners. For example, in 2010, Toyota faced global criticism over its handling of a recall related to sticking accelerator pedals. Likewise, in 2007 product safety problems led many toy makers to recall products during the holiday season. Mattel, the world’s largest toymaker with years of experience working in China, found itself in the middle of very negative global publicity. This case inquires as to what went so wrong?

    Preview copy in PDF Format

    Topics: Information Technology, Supply Chain

    Industry: Toys/Video Games

    Request Teaching Note (if available), for professors only | Order a Copy of this Case Study

  • Hasbro Interactive Photo

    Hasbro Interactive

    Chris Trimble
    Length: 16 pages
    Publication date: 2004
    Case#: 2-0021

    In the mid 1990s, Hasbro created Hasbro Interactive, a new business unit chartered to develop video games for PCs and other gaming systems based on Hasbro's many toy and game brands. After a few successful years, ambitions for Hasbro Interactive escalated dramatically. Would all games in the future be interactive?

    in PDF format

    Topics: Innovation, Marketing

    Industry: Toys/Video Games

    Request Teaching Note (if available), for professors only | Order a Copy of this Case Study

  • Microsoft’s Xbox Gamble Photo

    Microsoft’s Xbox Gamble

    John Greco T'02, under the supervision of Visiting Professor Melissa M. Appleyard
    Length: 24 pages
    Publication date: 2002
    Case#: 6-0011

    In 2001, Microsoft released its first Xbox console, going head to head with the latest from Nintendo and Sony. Would the market accept the new platform that offered higher performance, but at a higher price than the competition? Could the market support three players? How would the gaming market evolve over time, and would it accommodate a broader strategy that extended beyond video games? 

    Preview copy in PDF format (270K)

    Topics: Innovation, Strategy

    Industry: Toys/Video Games

    Request Teaching Note (if available), for professors only | Order a Copy of this Case Study

  • Learning from Mattel Photo

    Learning from Mattel

    John W. Torget T'00, under the supervision of Sydney Finkelstein
    Length: 8 pages
    Publication date: 2002
    Case#: 1-0072

    After just three years as chairman and chief executive, Ms. Barad’s 18-year storybook career with Mattel ended dramatically on February 3, 2000 with another disappointing earnings announcement. As one of only three women running a Fortune 500 company, she became a role model for millions of women aspiring to positions in the top ranks of corporate management.

    Preview copy in PDF format (79K)

    Topics: Marketing, Product Development, Sales

    Industry: Toys/Video Games

    Request Teaching Note (if available), for professors only | Order a Copy of this Case Study

  • Mattel, Inc: Vendor Operations in Asia Photo

    Mattel, Inc: Vendor Operations in Asia

    M. Eric Johnson, Tom Clock
    Length: 22 pages
    Publication date: 2000
    Case#: 1-0013

    After the announcement of the merger between Mattel, Inc. and its second largest rival, Tyco Toys, SVP Ron Montalto was embroiled in a debate over the sourcing strategy for the existing Hot Wheels product line and newly added Matchbox cars. Montalto had to decide whether Mattel should go forward with a new China plant, build a plant in Malaysia or Indonesia, expand one of the existing facilities, or outsource the surplus die-cast volume.

    Preview copy in PDF format (1415K)

    Topics: Manufacturing, Marketing, Sales, Supply Chain

    Industry: Toys/Video Games

    Request Teaching Note (if available), for professors only | Order a Copy of this Case Study


Ordering Reprints

Requests for reprint permission refer to copies you plan to make yourself from the clean case file we will email you, following payment. There is a fee per copy, set by Tuck's Fiscal Services.

Once your request has been confirmed and your fee arranged, please call with your credit card information or make checks payable to Dartmouth College and mail to:

Fiscal Services
Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth
100 Tuck Hall
Hanover, NH 03755
1.603.646.0187

All the cases and teaching materials listed are copyrighted by the Trustees of Dartmouth College.

All rights reserved.

Browse Entire Site by Topic


Case Studies by Topic

Case Studies by Industry

Case Studies by Date